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Offshore Injury

William Gee is determined to seek maximum results for his clients and provide knowledgeable representation for workers injured in offshore accidents caused by negligence.

With continuous research on the rulings and developments related to the Jones Act, Longshore Harbor Workers Compensation Act, and general maritime tort law, William Gee works diligently to stay current on maritime law. His commitment to ongoing education ensures that he can help clients seek the maximum potential compensation for offshore injuries.

If you or a family member has been seriously injured or killed as a result of an offshore maritime accident, contact a highly skilled offshore maritime injury lawyer before you discuss the accident with anyone else. Our legal team can guide you through your next steps.

Getting Much-Needed Compensation For Your Injuries

Maritime industries can be extremely challenging to work in, requiring all of your physical and mental capabilities to be successful and to do your job well. When you are injured it can put your career at risk – the worse the injury, the more difficult it will be to ever work in the same capacity. Yet you still need to pay your bills, take care of your family and cover your medical expenses. Often insurance payouts and workers’ compensation are not enough.

Our Lafayette maritime legal team understands the challenges you face following an injury. We have helped hundreds of injured maritime workers following offshore accidents. We know how important it is that you get fair compensation for your injuries.

Covering A Wide Range Of Offshore Injury Cases Throughout Louisiana

Our Louisiana law office works with clients injured in connection with any of the following offshore or maritime workplaces:

  • Crewboat
  • Inland barge
  • Dredge
  • Jack-up drilling rig
  • Semi-submersible rig
  • Production platform
  • Lifting incidents
  • Slips and falls
  • Vessel collisions
  • Incidents with crane
  • Explosions and fires
  • Unsafe equipment
  • Helicopter crashes

Understanding Your Legal Rights

The legal system surrounding offshore workers is complex and often difficult to navigate without the help of a dependable maritime attorney. This is why we always advise anyone injured in an offshore accident to contact our firm as soon as possible following the injury. Treatment of any injuries is always the first priority, but once your immediate medical needs have been addressed, it is important that you speak to a qualified legal representative as your next step. We can help you understand and protect your legal rights.

Committed to Gulf Coast offshore workers’ rights

Let us help you take the necessary steps to fight for the compensation you need and deserve.
Contact us using our contact form or call today for your free and confidential case evaluation:

(337) 222-2222

Jones Act and Seaman Claims

The Jones Act is a federal law that provides potential remedies to injured seamen against their employers if they were injured while working in the service of their employer’s vessel.

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Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act

Instead of having remedies under the Jones Act, persons engaged in maritime-related employment often rely on another federal law, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act.

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Commercial Diving Accidents

Although commercial divers are often covered by the Jones Act and entitled to a seaman’s remedies, this is an unsettled and complex area of maritime and admiralty law.

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Drilling and Other Offshore Accidents

Offshore drilling activities, although crucial to our country and economy, inevitably result in accidents and injuries.

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Boat and Vessel Accidents

In addition to maritime and offshore, workers’ claims against their employers for injuries, non-employment related and recreational boat accidents occur frequently.

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Barge Accidents

Injuries from barge accidents are often caused by negligent and inattentive vessel operators as well as unseaworthy conditions, such as defective equipment or poorly-trained crew members.

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Jones Act and Seaman Claims

The Jones Act is a federal law that provides potential remedies to injured seamen against their employers if they were injured while working in the service of their employer’s vessel. Under the Jones Act, the employer of a seaman may be liable for damages, including pain and suffering, if it fails to furnish an injured seaman with a safe place to work.

Because the Jones Act does not define “seaman,” determining who is a Jones Act seaman can often be a complicated legal question. Generally, a “seaman” is a member of a vessel’s crew who is exposed to the “perils of the sea” as part of his employment. A seaman is someone who contributes to the mission or work of the vessel or watercraft and who has a substantial connection to a particular vessel or fleet of vessels. One rule of thumb test for whether an individual is a Jones Act seaman is whether the person worked 30% of his time aboard a “vessel in navigation.” Employers often fight Jones Act seaman status in litigation because seamen are considered protected “wards of the court” and potentially are entitled to types of compensation not available to other types of employees or workers. For example, most workers are not entitled to pain and suffering damages from their employers. And, even if there is no fault or negligence, a Jones Act employer must provide “maintenance and cure” to a seaman who is hurt while in the service of the employer’s ship or vessel.

Maintenance and cure provides benefits to an injured seaman much like health and accident insurance. There are penalties as well if an employer does not provide an injured seaman with maintenance and cure benefits. William Gee has litigated the “Jones Act seaman” question many times and monitors the Jones Act case law as it is handed down so that he is knowledgeable of the most recent developments in the maritime law on the seaman status issue. What types of watercrafts are considered Jones Act vessels is also an issue in which the law is frequently changing and currently expanding, such that individuals who may not have previously been considered Jones Act seamen may now be.

Contact us to learn more about the Jones Act, seaman status, maintenance and cure, and other remedies available to an injured seaman, including under the law of unseaworthiness.

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Claims against Vessel Owners under the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act

Many persons are engaged in maritime-related employment but are not considered seamen. For example, longshoremen, shipbuilders, ship repairers, and others who perform land-based types of work (such as welding) on or over water are considered to be performing maritime work but are not considered to be seamen. Instead of having remedies under the Jones Act against their employers, such workers often must rely on another federal law, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (LHWCA). The LHWCA is similar to state-law workers’ compensation and provides injured maritime employees with workers’ compensation remedies against their employers for work-related personal injuries.

The LHWCA usually applies to workers injured on piers, wharfs, shipyards, and drilling platforms. Although the LHWCA typically limits a worker’s remedies against his employer to disability benefits and medical benefits, if the non-seaman was injured while working on a vessel, the LHWCA sometimes permits a claim against the vessel owner for liability and damages under general maritime law. Contact us to learn more about claims against Vessel Owners under the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act.

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Commercial Diving Accidents

In addition to the risks and dangers all maritime workers face, commercial divers face additional hazards associated with malfunctioning dive equipment, improper vessel operations over which they have little to no control and inappropriate medical treatment caused by lack of knowledge of dive medicine. Although commercial divers are often covered by the Jones Act and entitled to a seaman’s remedies, this is an unsettled and complex area of maritime and admiralty law where dive contractors and vessel owners have had some success in defeating Jones Act seaman status with respect to divers. In cases where the Jones Act does not apply to a commercial diving accident, general maritime law may provide a claim for damages against a boat or its crew. In some cases, however, a commercial diver may only have remedies under the LHWCA. Contact us to learn more about claims for commercial diving accidents.

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Drilling and Other Offshore Accidents

Offshore drilling activities, although crucial to our country and economy, inevitably result in accidents and injuries. Simply put, oil fields are dangerous places to work, and defective machinery, toxic fumes, explosions, and rigging accidents can all cause serious injuries or result in death. Although not all rigs are considered Jones Act vessels, if an individual was injured while working on a movable drilling rig, such as a jack-up rig, that worker may be a Jones Act seaman, who potentially is entitled to damages, if negligence, or an unseaworthy condition caused injury. A seaman also is typically entitled to maintenance and cure medical treatment for an on-the-job injury. Contact us to learn more about claims for drilling and other offshore accidents.

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Boat and Vessel Accidents

In addition to maritime and offshore workers’ claims against their employers for injuries, non-employment related and recreational boat accidents occur frequently, both in territorial state waters and on the high seas. Negligence claims arising from these types of vessel and boating accidents are usually covered by general maritime law. If a death occurs at sea, maritime laws provide surviving members of the victim’s family potential remedies, under Death on the High Seas Act, Jones Act, or general maritime law; if the related incident occurs in state waters, state law may supplement the maritime law. Contact us to learn more about claims for vessel and boating accidents.

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Barge Accidents

Barge crewmen and workers are subject to many of the same risks and dangers as other offshore workers. Injuries from barge accidents are often caused by negligent and inattentive vessel operators as well as unseaworthy conditions, such as defective equipment or poorly-trained crew members. Workers on barges are generally covered by the same laws and provided the same remedies as other offshore and maritime workers. Contact us to learn more about claims for barge accidents.

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  • "Gee got me over $1,000,000 in my pocket for my maritime case - Gee is loyal and I recommend Gee as an attorney."
    – Justin, client
  • "William Gee went above and beyond to make sure that I was financially secure for the rest of my life."
    – Kenneth, client
  • "I have no money worries whatsoever now. ...Gee treated me with respect and got me a structured settlement so my bills are paid for lifetime."
    – Mary, client
  • "Gee tried my offshore case to a jury in Napoleonville, Louisiana - Energetically - Gee beat the side. I am very happy with Gee!"
    – Kiley, client
  • "William Gee's a real fighter."
    – Tim, client

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